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English

Key Stage 3

 

 

 

 

What do students study and in what order?

The English department at Rossett School have created a new, fun and engaging curriculum for students in Years 7, 8 and 9 which will provide vital links to the new GCSE specifications.  This will focus around three core texts and will thematically link other skills, such as analysing poetry and reading pre-twentieth literature.

Throughout their key stage three career, students will study a vast range of novels, plays, poems, non-fiction texts and Shakespearean plays. In order to help them move smoothly from key stage two, whilst giving them the skills they will need to achieve at key stage four.

To support students’ literacy skills, it is policy in English to begin each lesson with a grammar/spelling focused starter/activity and these skills will be assessed, and built upon, as pupils progress through their education.

Students will also have opportunities throughout each term to use the library during their English lessons the to read, complete book quizzes and take out new books.  It will also enable the department to monitor students more easily.

A plethora of opportunities  to use and enhance their literacy and English skills awaits all key stage three students at Rossett. From participating and competing as part of the debating team, to representing the school at the National spelling bee competition, students at Rossett are never short of ways to develop their reading, writing and speaking and listening skills.

Reading at Rossettdownload

Very quickly at the start of Year 7 students are enrolled on the ‘Accelerated Reading’ programme. This enables students to choose a reading book that is matched to their ability. We encourage 25 minutes of reading every day. An English lesson each week is dedicated to reading and reviewing progress made with AR. Sixth Form students work with Year 7 students helping them to overcome any reading barriers and engage with the reading programme. We also make regular trips to our fantastic new Learning Resource Centre where students are given the time to choose the right book for them under the guidance of Mrs Huett our Learning Resource Centre Administrator.

 

The iPad is a fantastic resource to use with ‘Accelerated Reading’ as students can take short tests on line after each book to monitor their progress. It records all of the books that are completed on a virtual bookshelf and even counts every single word that students read! Reach one million words and students are invited to a special celebratory lunch in the Summer term.

How are students assessed?

Students will be formally assessed on their reading and writing skills every term, alongside a speaking and listening assessment. This will take place during lessons and your child will be equipped with the knowledge of what is needed to achieve their target level.

 

Please follow us on Twitter at @k3english for all English news! Here we will showcase the great work that our students do, recommend books and competitions together with suggesting ways that you can help to support your children at home.

How can parents best support their child?

To enable your child to succeed, ensure they complete their homework to the best of their ability. As a school, we use COW time (check our work) and DIRT (dedicated independent reflection time) to promote responsibility and enhance proofreading skills. If these skills were promoted outside the classroom too, the benefit for the students would be tenfold.

Additionally, as we are part of the accelerated reading scheme, encouragement to read their accelerated reading book for at least twenty minutes a day would be further enhance key literacy skills.

We intend to develop the Accelerated Reading programme in the Autumn term so that parents can access their child’s reading record from home.

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

What topics do students study and in what order?

In English Language we are pleased to offer all students experience of literature and language at GCSE across a two-year linear course. Students will develop their reading skills with particular focus on non-fiction texts from both pre-and post 1900 together with a wide range of extracts from the modern classics.

 

They will learn to write in a range of styles including creative narratives, broadsheet articles and blogs.

English Literature

The course takes a skills-based approach to the study of English Literature across the genres.

The following areas will be studied:

Shakespeare – current texts include ‘Romeo and Juliet’ and ‘Macbeth’

19th Century novel – current texts include; ‘Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’

and  ‘A Christmas Carol’

Modern texts – current text ‘An Inspector Calls’

Poetry – AQA Conflict anthology.

What exam board do we follow?

AQA English Language and English Literature GCSE-Linear courses

How are students assessed?

English Language

Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

Section A: Reading

Section B: Writing  - descriptive or narrative task

1 hour 45 minutes 50% of GCSE

 

Paper 2: Writers’ viewpoint and perspectives

Section A : Reading one non- fiction and one literary non-fiction text

Section B: Writing to present a viewpoint

1 hour and 45 minutes 50% of GCSE

 

English Literature

Shakespeare and the 19th century novel 1 hour and 45 minutes 40% of final grade

Modern texts and Poetry 2 hours and 15 minutes 60% of final grade.

 

We will update here any changes to text choice and the study guides that are available to purchase through school.

 

As a faculty we spend two years teaching the skills and content that will support and enthuse students through a range of engaging lessons and activities. We provide helpful support and feedback to help students become responsible learners.

How can parents best support their child?

A homework club will be starting soon – date to be confirmed here where students can work quietly under the supervision of a number of English teachers on hand to assist.

As English Language is skills-based, it is crucial that students experience a range of reading and writing. We encourage students to read outside of school, be it a newspaper or a novel.

You can also follow us on Twitter @k4english which will keep you updated with all GCSE news and recommendations to help your child succeed.

Key Stage 5

What do students study and in what order?

MEDIA STUDIES

Through studying AQA Media Studies students will view, evaluate and analyse a variety of media products, and develop practical skills spanning a range of media forms. Students will find contemporary, diverse topics and varied and engaging content, helping them to develop research, problem-solving skills as well as their creativity. They’ll also refine their debating skills through the discussion of contemporary issues from a range of perspectives.

Our current Year 13s will be the first cohort to sit the new specification in June 2019. This is a two-year course with no option at present to complete the AS course.

The course is structured through learning a set of core skills covering the following areas:

  • Media language
  • Media representation
  • Media industries
  • Media audience

These core skills must then be applied to a number of Close Study Products which include both contemporary and historical texts.

Year 12/Year 13 (revision of CSPs + coursework)

 

TV study ‘The Missing’ and ‘Witnesses’

Newspapers ‘The Daily Mail’ and ‘i’

Music videos ‘Letter to the free’ and ‘Billie Jean’

Advertising ‘That Boss Life’ and ‘Score’

Radio ‘War of the Worlds’ and ‘The Surgery’

Independent film ‘Chicken’

Gaming ‘Metroid’ ‘Tomb Raider’ The Sims freeplay’

Magazines ‘Men’s health’ and ‘Oh Comely’

Webpages ‘Teen Vogue’ and ‘The Voice’

The coursework component changes year upon year as the specific briefs are issued however each year students will have the opportunity to film and  edit original footage, produce print pieces with original photography or record a radio broadcast.

KS5 – English Language

Our A-level English Language specification offers opportunities for students to develop their subject expertise by engaging creatively and critically with a wide range of texts and discourses. Students will create texts and reflect critically on their own processes of production, while analysing the texts produced by others. The specification explores the study of English Language both as a medium of communication and as a topic in its own right, with an emphasis on the ability of students to pursue lines of enquiry, debate different views, and work independently to research aspects of language in use. Language is seen as a creative tool for expression and social connection, as well as for individual cognition. The study of language as a symbolic system used to assert power in society is also fundamental to the scope of this specification.

This is a two year course with no option currently to complete the AS course.

Y12 Term 1: Child Language Acquisition and Frameworks (Grammar, Lexis, Semantics, etc.)

Y12 Term 2: Language, Gender and Sexuality. Occupation and Representation.

Accent and dialect. Age and Slang.

Y12 Term 3: Language Change and introduction of coursework.

Y13 Term 1: Article writing, coursework (original writing and individual project 20% of final grade)

Y13 Term 2: World Englishes and Globalisation of the English Language.

Y13 Term 3: Revision of diversity topics and essay writing skills.

 

English Literature A Level– Year 12-13.

Year 12

Autumn 1

A Streetcar Named Desire

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen

Autumn 2

A Streetcar Named Desire

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Unseen Poetry

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen (Poetry & Unseen)

Spring 1

The Duchess of Malfi (compared with Streetcar)

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Unseen Poetry

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen (Poetry & Unseen)

Spring 2

The Duchess of Malfi (compared with Streetcar)

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Unseen Poetry

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen (Poetry & Unseen)

Summer 1

The Duchess of Malfi (compared with Streetcar)

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Unseen Poetry

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen (Poetry & Unseen)

Summer 2

The Duchess of Malfi (compared with Streetcar)

Philip Larkin & Carol Ann Duffy

Unseen Prose

Unseen Poetry

 

Assessments: Exam style question on Drama, Poetry and Unseen (Poetry & Unseen)

 

What exam board do we follow?

AQA Media Studies

AQA English Language

WJEC English Literature

How are students assessed?

Media Studies

Media one 2 hour written paper 35%

Media two 2 hour written paper 35%

Coursework portfolio 30%

 

English Language

Internal assessment:

Students complete an assessment every two weeks, this can either take the form of retrieval practice, evaluative essays or opinion article writing.

External assessment:

Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society

  • Textual variations and representations
  • Children’s language development (0-11 years)

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

100 marks, 40% of A-Level

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change

  • Language, diversity and change
  • Language discourses
  • Writing skills

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

100 marks, 40% of A-Level

NEA: Language in Action

  • Language investigation
  • Original Writing

3,500 words, 100 marks, 20% of A-Level

English Literature

How can parents best support their child?

Media Studies

Parents can support their child by encouraging them to read widely across a range of genres including for example a Sunday newspaper, or suggesting going to see a film together or watching the latest Netflix sensation that can then be discussed together.

Support students by creating a space where homework can be completed and assist school in ensuring that deadlines are met.

English Language

Encouraging reading of a range of texts, considering meanings and representation (e.g. articles, blogs, websites)

Provide a positive learning environment for homework and revision to be completed.

Encourage students to regularly check our Twitter feed @asa2lang and read the range of resources that are shared.

English Literature

Provide a positive learning environment for homework and revision to be completed.

Ensure students are reading the key texts in preparation for lessons and exams.

 

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